The Route 91 Harvest Festival memorial as seen at the Welcome to Las Vegas sign on Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017.(Jeff Scheid/The Nevada Independent)

Editor’s note: Seven days. Never enough hours.

Stacks of paperwork at the office and piles of laundry at home. It’s a never-ending cycle, which makes it difficult to stay on top of the endless news nuggets flowing from the White House, state capital, local government, and business community. We get it — and we’re in the news business.

Enter “About Last Week.” This is our way of bringing news-hungry but time-strapped readers up to speed on happenings that may have flown under the radar. Our promise: We’ll keep it brief. Our hope: You’ll read (or skim) and keep checking back every Monday.

So, without further ado, here are some noteworthy things that happened in Nevada last week.

Watch out for flood-damaged vehicles hitting the market

Car shoppers, beware: Hurricane-damaged vehicles could be making their way to Nevada.

The Nevada Division of Insurance is urging consumers to be extra cautious when buying a used vehicle because thousands of vehicles were damaged in Hurricanes Irma and Harvey. Insurance companies typically deem flood-damaged vehicles as total losses, sending them to auction houses or salvage yards, but some buyers will try to resell the damaged cars without disclosing their history.

It’s only legal to resell total-loss vehicles if the damage is disclosed to the new buyer because insurance companies often hike rates for those cars, if insuring them at all.

“Nevada consumers need to be extremely careful and do their research before purchasing a used vehicle to make sure they are not buying a flood-damaged car,” Nevada  Insurance Commissioner Barbara Richardson said in a statement. “Not only will they be buying an unsafe vehicle prone to failure, but they may also not be able to get that vehicle insured.”

Consumers should avoid that situation by shopping at reputable dealers, inspecting the vehicle for a musty or moldy smell and keeping an eye out for foggy headlights or tail lights, which could indicate trapped moisture, or rusty cables under the hood. Buyers can also visit the National Motor Vehicle Title Information System website to view a vehicle’s history.

— Jackie Valley

Republicans gain ground in voter registration

November marked another month of Republicans gaining ground in Nevada’s voter registration balance, though Democrats still hold a considerable lead.

According to voter registration statistics released by the secretary of state’s office on Friday, Republicans added 2,686 voters over the month, while Democrats added 1,563 — a difference of 1,123.

Though it cut into the advantage, Democrats statewide still hold a 76,629 voter registration advantage over the state Republican party, or good for a 39 to 34 percent split of the state’s 1.4 million registered voters.

Slightly more than 21 percent of Nevada voters are registered as nonpartisan, with another 2,403 voters registering without identifying with a political party in November.

— Riley Snyder

Las Vegas tourism dips in month after mass shooting

Tourism volume in Las Vegas dropped more than 4 percent in October after the city experienced the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history on the first of that month.

The Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority said October was a strong month for convention attendance, but said drive-in tourists who postponed or canceled their trips following the shooting drove a 4.2 percent drop in visitor volume.

Favorable changes in conference rotations meant Las Vegas had 35.9 percent more convention visitors this October than a year ago. Conventions included the National Business Aviation Association, with 25,600 attendees, and the Global Gaming Expo, which had 26,000 attendees and was held in September last year.

Gaming revenue on the Las Vegas Strip dropped 6.1 percent in October due to people paying less and the timing of revenue collections. In Clark County overall, revenues dropped 0.3 percent compared with a year ago.

— Michelle Rindels

THE INDY REWIND

From recall updates to education budget cuts, here’s a look at what The Nevada Independent reporters covered last week:

Hours after tax reform vote, Heller defends the bill at Las Vegas event

Freedom House: How one Las Vegas recovery center is helping break the cycle of addiction

Former staffer accuses Democratic Rep. Ruben Kihuen of sexual harassment; top Dems, including Pelosi and Rosen, call for resignation

Education leaders still trying to problem-shoot new law that affects volunteers

Indy Congressional Tracker: Republicans celebrate, Democrats decry Senate tax bill passage

Dispatches from Washington: Senate debates tax reform against backdrop of sexual harassment allegations

Judge again tells felons to behave because Trump ‘could use your vote’

As tax vote draws close, Rosen launches ad accusing Heller of flipping on federal deficit

School trustees save hundreds of positions at expense of district’s ending-fund balance

Sandoval calls on Congress to reauthorize ‘critical’ Children’s Health Insurance program funding

Secretary of State pushes back after Cannizzaro attorneys ask to modify recall signature verification process

Cortez Masto backs long-shot effort to delay Senate GOP tax plan

The Indy Explains: The Senate Republican tax bill and where Nevada leaders stand

Former Assembly Democratic caucus leader won’t run for reelection in 2018

Wolfson, other DAs urge Nevada officials to implement gun background check law as court case continues

State superintendent delays moving forward with controversial gender-diverse regulation

NV Energy backs off proposed residential rate hike